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Source: The demon, called Green Goblin, tries different strategies to disarm the one who stands in the way of his plans. I know I complain a lot, and I know that you and me, we've got issues, but right now, just for tonight . Although the purpose of this page is to identify Peter Parker's religious background as Protestant, and to point out that the character occasionally expresses religious faith (at times sincere, at times casual), it would be a mistake to give the impression that any overt form of Protestant Christianity is a major aspect of his character. They think of Madalyn O'Hair, a woman who knew how to hate.He tries temptation, lies, flattery - ideas that are neither creative nor new. Spider-Man's religious background is most evident simply through his character and day-to-day actions. On the other hand, when people think of Christ, they think of a man who knew how to love.Whatever the source of your power, you are tied to the Spider. We're still working out the finer details, but it basically works like this: He does something really spiteful . "I think when I go to superheroes, I see there is a religious metaphor to begin with," says comic-book writer Steven T. contained a list of the "suspected" religions of superheroes... 2) - the 9/11 issue focusing on the aftermath of the destruction of the World Trade Center. I'm also amazed at how well diversified the hero population seems to be.It is your icon, your totem, the template for your identity. Newsweek also listed Spider-Man as a Protestant, The Thing as Jewish, The Hulk as a lapsed Catholic, Daredevil as a Catholic, Batman as a lapsed Catholic or disaffected Episcopalian and Captain America as a Protestant... In this story, Spider-Man appears to argue with God about to why these things have happened. As for Spider-Man/Peter Parker, I always felt as though he was Protestant, but I couldn't put a finger on it.After these 33 characters had been kidnapped by the Goddess, the remaining superheroes gathered to try to figure out what was going on. And then you'd get all bored and grumpy and you'd blame it on me. MSNBC published an article by Alex Johnson that cited this website as well as interviews and other sources. Peter being a very science oriented individual tends to dismiss the religious angle many times though he has been known to pray in some way but it's typically prayed with a "if you're real" or "we don't get along well, God" or some such comment. He sort of talks like those old Jewish guys you often see in the park playing chess.The Vision analyzed data about who had been taken and who had not, and explained his analysis (Now that the appropriate files have been examined I believe I have sufficient hard data to put forth that theory I mentioned earlier. The article's material about Spider-Man drew heavily from this "Religious Affiliation of Spider-Man" page. However that could just be a NYC thing, I never picked it up when I lived there. However thinking about it more and more, I have seen him celebrate Christmas. Jean_genie 08/22/2003, Christmas is a lot like Saint Patrick's Day, in that most people celebrate it for the celebration itself, and not so much for its meaning.A number of Spider-Man writers since Stan Lee have hinted at Peter Parker's Protestant-leaning background and beliefs. Its sting quickly subdues its prey by paralyzing the spider's central nervous system. The spider wasp carries its prey to its nest, or if the spider is too large to carry in flight, the wasp simply drags it to the nest. Rogue from the X-Men was raised as a Baptist, and Spider-Man prays to what is assumed to be a Protestant God... ...while we're on the subject, the article uses data gleaned from to imbue other superheroes with their likely religious orientations. [Uncle Ben fades away, and Peter is left standing alone, his arms still held as if hugging Uncle Ben. We next see him back in the apartment, where he has gone to sit on the edge of the bed. From: "Spidey Question for the Legion" page, started 6 July 2005, on "Captain Comics Round Table" message board/forum website ( viewed 20 December 2005): tsj017 Jul 7 2004, AM I may be mistaken, but I seem to remember Pete/Spidey having some sort of inner monologue with God in one of the latter Paul Jenkins issues of Peter Parker: Spider-Man. It was ], after the Goblin turned Flash into a vegetable [i.e., puts him into a coma and possibly a brain-dead state].

Peter Parker has never been depicted as a regular churchgoer and could probably not be said to be religiously observant on a daily basis in any organized way. There's definitely a strong Christian influence there anyway.

Above: After warning of impending danger, Doctor Strange suggests that the next thing Peter Parker (Spider-Man) should do is pray. It's Peter again..." [From , which kept you safe from prying eyes, you were noticed. Peter seems to find at least partial answers to his questions both in this scene and in the coming story arc. Why would you have the Goblin put my buddy Flash Thompson in a coma so that he may never walk or talk again? Exploring Faith & Spirituality in Comic Books."' "In the process of telling their stories of human - and superhuman - characters, comics deal with issues near and dear to our hearts: faith, hope, belief, guilt, justice, redemption, ultimate meaning, ultimate evil," he writes in the book's introduction. Also, when Tracer made a comment to Aunt May about hmans creating their own gods, Aunt May replied, "God created people, Tommy, not the other way around." From: "Religious Affiliation of Comic Book Super-heroes", posted 24 June 2006 on "No Sheep" blog website ( viewed 25 June 2006): This site [link to this site] compiled an extremely detailed and well researched list of comic book super-heroes and their associated religious affiliations.

When you went off the path, you entered the food chain. From: PETER PARKER (thinking): Me and God, we have this little game. And where did I go so wrong that you needed to hold a miror to my heart, just so's I can see my ugly reflection? Garrett, a professor of English at Baylor University in Texas, is seeking his Master of Divinity degree at Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest. Batman can be seen as "an avatar of God's justice." Spider-Man teaches lessons about power and responsibility. Fairly interesting to me that so many actually have affiliations.

Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Joe Quesada has stated in his Joe Fridays column that Peter Parker is "most likely of Christian Protestant beliefs" ( Joe Fridays/New Joe Fridays28.html). I'd like to discuss what religious beliefs are favorite costumed hero's belong to. But beyond that, what do we know of superhero's beliefs?

Religious affiliation has usually been a relatively taboo subject in mainstream superhero comics. I'm thinking of mostly the Marvel Universe, but you DC fans feel free to contribute as well... From: "Religious Affiliation of Comic Book Characters" forum discussion, started 10 March 2007 on "Brian Michael Bendis" part of "Comic Creator Boards" section of "Jinxworld Forums" website ( viewed 6 June 2007): Joe E , AM ASTONISHINGLY detailed site that delves into the religions of superheroes. Matt O'Keefe , AM For a lot of characters, religion shouldn't be mentioned.

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